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disneysmermaids:

cherribalm:

site that you can type in the definition of a word and get the word

site for when you can only remember part of a word/its definition 

site that gives you words that rhyme with a word

site that gives you synonyms and antonyms

THAT FIRST SITE IS EVERY WRITER’S DREAM DO YOU KNOW HOW MANY TIMES I’VE TRIED WRITING SOMETHING AND THOUGHT GOD DAMN IS THERE A SPECIFIC WORD FOR WHAT I’M USING TWO SENTENCES TO DESCRIBE AND JUST GETTING A BUNCH OF SHIT GOOGLE RESULTS


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The problems of writing 

clevergirlhelps:

  • Having a Beginning
  • Having an Ending
  • But WHERE’S THE MIDDLE?!?
  • HOW DO I GET TO THE ENDING
  • WHAT IS A PLOT
  • WHAT ARE PLOT DETAILS
  • WHAT IS WRITING

And most importantly:

  • HOW DO I TITLE

FRIENDS


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impishtubist:

shadowstep-of-bast:

tomhiddllestop:

IF YOU LOVE WRITING BUT DON’T HAVE THE INSPIRATION FOR A 10-PART BOOK SAGA YOU SHOULD TAKE A LOOK AT THIS SITE

IT’S INCREDIBLY HELPFUL AND CAN FOR INSTANCE GENERATE TOPICS AND FIRST LINES, CONTAINS LOADS OF EXERCISES AND YOU CAN FIND PLENTY OF WRITING TIPS.

BLESS YOU I LOVE YOU OH MY GODS I’VE NEEDED THIS

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL MY LIFE?


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What Do You Capitalize in Titles? 

writeworld:

How do you decide what to capitalize in the title of your book or research paper? Well, you have to be able to recognize verbs and nouns when you see them, but even so, the English rules about using capital letters in titles are not difficult to follow.

In this example, Lochness is hosting a party to celebrate the publication of his new book, I AM NOT A MONSTER. He has postponed the party three times because he can’t decide how to capitalize the title. What should he do? Actually, he should scrap the book, which consists of 540 pages of unbelievably boring detail about his humdrum life. Apart from that issue, here’s what Lochness should do:

  • Capitalize I and Monster. I is always uppercase and Monster is an important word. Also, I is the first word of the title, and the first word of the title is always capitalized.
  • Capitalize Am because it’s a verb, and verbs are at the heart of the title’s meaning.
  • Capitalize Not because it changes the meaning of the verb and thus has an important job to do in the sentence.
  • Lowercase the only word left — a. Never capitalize articles (a, an, and the) unless they’re the first words in the title.

Do you see the general principles? Here is a summary of the rules for all sorts of titles:

  • Capitalize the first word in the title.
  • Capitalize verbs and other important words.
  • Lowercase unimportant words, such as articles (a, an, the), conjunctions (words that connect, such as and, or, nor, and the like), and prepositions (of, with, by, and other words that express a relationship between two elements in the sentence).

The resulting book title is I Am Not a Monster.

Some grammarians capitalize prepositions with more than four letters. Others tell you to lowercase all prepositions, even the huge ones, such as concerning, according to, and so on. (Your best bet is to check with your immediate authority (editor, boss, teacher, and so on) to make sure that you write in the style to which he or she is accustomed.

When writing the title of a magazine or newspaper, should you capitalize the word the? Yes, if the is part of the official name, as in The New York Times. No, if the publication doesn’t include the in its official name, as in the Daily News.

Which words should you capitalize in these titles?

the importance of being lochness

romeo and lulu

slouching toward homework

Answers [under the Read More]:

Read More


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102 Resources for Fiction Writers 

ruthlesscalculus:

Are you still stuck for ideas for National Novel Writing Month? Or are you working on a novel at a more leisurely pace? Here are 102 resources on Character, Point of View, Dialogue, Plot, Conflict, Structure, Outlining, Setting, and World Building, plus some links to generate Ideas and Inspiration.

CHARACTER, POINT OF VIEW, DIALOGUE

10 Days of Character Building

Name Generators

Name Playground

The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test

Priming the idea pump (A character checklist shamlessly lifted from acting)

How to Create a Character

Seven Common Character Types

Handling a Cast of Thousands – Part I: Getting to Know Your Characters

It’s Not What They Say …

Establishing the Right Point of View: How to Avoid “Stepping Out of Character”

How to Start Writing in the Third Person

Web Resources for Developing Characters

What are the Sixteen Master Archetypes?

Character: A compilation of guidance from classical and contemporary experts on creating great dramatic characters

Building Fictional Characters

Fiction Writer’s Character Chart

Character Building Workshop

Tips for Characterization

Fiction Writer’s Character Chart

Villains are People, Too, But …

Top 10 Tips for Writing Dialogue

Speaking of Dialogue

Dialogue Tips

Advantages, Disadvantages and Skills (character traits)

How to Write a Character Bible

Character Development Exercises

All Your Characters Sounds the Same — And They’re Not a Hivemind!

Medieval Names Archive

Sympathy Without Saintliness

Writing the Other: Bridging Cultural Difference for Successful Fiction

Family Echo (family tree website)

Interviewing Characters: Follow the Energy

100 Character Development Questions for Writers

Behind the Name

Lineage Chart Layout Generator

PLOT, CONFLICT, STRUCTURE, OUTLINE

How to Write a Novel: The Snowflake Method

Effectively Outlining Your Plot

Conflict and Character within Story Structure

Outlining Your Plot

Ideas, Plots & Using the Premise Sheets

How to Write a Novel

Creating Conflict and Sustaining Suspense

Plunge Right In … Into Your Story, That Is!

Fiction Writing Tips: Story Grid

Tips for Creating a Compelling Plot

Writer’s “Cheat Sheets”

The Thirty-six (plus one) Dramatic Situations

The Evil Overlord Devises a Plot: Excerpt from Stupid Plotting Tricks

Conflict Test

What is Conflict?

Monomyth

The Hero’s Journey: Summary of the Steps

Outline Your Novel in Thirty Minutes

Plotting Without Fears

Novel Outlining 101

Writing the Perfect Scene

Fight Scenes 101

Basic Plots in Literature

One-Page Plotting

The Great Swampy Middle

SETTING, WORLD BUILDING

Magical World Builder’s Guide

I Love the End of the World

World Building 101

The Art of Description: Eight Tips to Help You Bring Your Settings to Life

Creating the Perfect Setting – Part I

Creating a Believable World

An Impatient Writer’s Approach to Worldbuilding

Fantasy Worldbuilding Questions

Setting

Character and Setting Interactions

Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds

Creating Fantasy Worlds

Questions About Worldbuilding

Maps Workshop — Developing the Fictional World Through Mapping

World Builder Projects

IDEAS, INSPIRATION

Quick Story Idea Generator

Solve Your Problems Simply by Saying Them Out Loud

Busting Your Writing Rut

Writing Inspiration, or Sex on a Bicycle

Creative Acceleration: 11 Tips to Engineer a Productive Flow

The Seven Major Beginner Mistakes

Complete Your First Book with these 9 Simple Writing Habits

Free Association, Active Imagination, Twilight Imaging

Random Book Title Generator

Finishing Your Novel

Story Starters and Idea Generators

REVISION

How to Rewrite

One-Pass Manuscript Revision: From First Draft to Last in One Cycle

Editing Recipe

Cliche Finder

Revising Your Novel: Read What You’ve Written

Writing 101: So You Want to Write a Novel Part 3: Revising a Novel

TOOLS and SOFTWARE

My Writing Nook (online text editor; free)

Bubbl.us (online mind map application; free)

Freemind (mind map application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

XMind (mind map application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

Liquid Story Binder (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $45.95; Windows, portable)

Scrivener (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $39.95; Mac)

SuperNotecard (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $29; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

yWriter (novel organization and writing software; free; Windows, Linux, portable)

JDarkRoom (minimalist text editor; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

AutoRealm (map creation software; free; Windows, Linux with Wine)


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uglytshirt:

How to end your novel

marypsue:

nanowrimodiary:

The Dos and Don’ts By James V. Smith Jr.


Don’ts

  1. Don’t introduce any new characters or subplots. Any appearances within the last 50 pages should have been foreshadowed earlier, even if mysteriously.
  2. Don’t describe, muse, explain or philosophize. Keep description to a minimum, but maximize action and conflict. You have placed all your charges. Now, light the fuse and run.
  3. Don’t change voice, tone or attitude. An ending will feel tacked on if the voice of the narrator suddenly sounds alien to the voice that’s been consistent for the previous 80,000 words.
  4. Don’t resort to gimmicks. No quirky twists or trick endings. The final impression you want to create is a positive one. Don’t leave your reader feeling tricked or cheated.

Dos

  1. Do create that sense of Oh, wow! Your best novelties and biggest surprises should go here. Readers love it when some early, trivial detail plays a part in the finale. 
  2. Do enmesh your reader deeply in the outcome. Get her so involved that she cannot put down your novel to go to bed, to work or even to the bathroom until she sees how it turns out.
  3. Do resolve the central conflict. You don’t have to provide a happily-ever-after ending, but do try to uplift. Readers want to be uplifted, and editors try to give readers what they want.
  4. Do afford redemption to your heroic character. No matter how many mistakes she has made along the way, allow the reader—and the character—to realize that, in the end, she has done the right thing.
  5. Do tie up loose ends of significance. Every question you planted in a reader’s mind should be addressed, even if the answer is to say that a character will address that issue later, after the book ends.
  6. Do mirror your final words to events in your opener. When you reach the ending, go back to ensure some element in each of your complications will point to the beginning. It’s the tie-back tactic. Merely create a feeling that the final words hearken to an earlier moment in the story.

Writers Write’ is a great blog (not on tumblr as far as I’m aware) with writing tips, quotes, and more. Definitely worth checking out! 
They’re also on facebook, if anyone’s interested.

I would argue that affording redemption to a heroic character is optional, and not just optional, but also achievable in a multitude of sneaky ways. And sometimes, it’s essential to the novel that the ‘heroic’ character NOT be allowed to realise that they’ve ‘done the right thing’. Sometimes they haven’t. Sometimes they’ve been doing the wrong thing all along and they just haven’t been able to see it. Sometimes your ending is tragic, and not just because the heroic character dies. The death isn’t what makes tragedy tragic, it’s the fall. (See Macbeth for further illustration.)


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Nonsexual Intimacy 

greenchestnuts:

For Asexual Awareness Week, Elizabeth Barrette, aka ysabetwordsmith, posted a list of types of nonsexual intimacy that I found really interesting both as an asexual and as a writer:

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

Part Five


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Using Real Psychology in Your Writing 

thisisnotpsychology:


USING ARCHETYPES IN YOUR STORIES


Writing Better Romantic Relationships

This series looks at the Anima/Animus archetype, which is most often seen in romantic relationships, and how to use it to create more compelling romantic relationships, regardless of genre. Looks at what the anima and animus are, how they’re formed, and why fiction writers need to understand them. There’s also some and what makes love grow - and how happily ever afters really work.


Creating Better Antagonists


FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY


archetypewriting.com


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thegeekasaurus:

Ultimate Writing Resource List

a massively extended version of ruthlesscalculus’ post

General Tips

Character Development

Female Characters

Male Characters

Tips for Specific Characters

Dialogue

Point of View

Plot, Conflict, Structure and Outline

Setting & Worldbuilding

Creativity Boosters* denotes prompts

Revision & Grammar

Tools & Software

Specific Help


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theinformationdump:

Body Language Cheat Sheet for Writers

As described by Selnick’s article:

Author and doctor of clinical psychology Carolyn Kaufman has released a one-page body language cheat sheet of psychological “tells” (PDF link) fiction writers can use to dress their characters.


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writing resources 

shotgunanderson:

so awhile ago someone asked me to go through process/resources for what i do when i write. this isn’t for everybody, everybody has different motivators. but some of these links have been useful for me in the past.

generally speaking, i just try to make sure i’m sitting properly, take regular breaks, have plenty of water at hand, and good music. the rest varies on just how much i’m feeling it on a given day, and how badly i need motivation. hopefully this will help!


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writing resources 

shotgunanderson:

so awhile ago someone asked me to go through process/resources for what i do when i write. this isn’t for everybody, everybody has different motivators. but some of these links have been useful for me in the past.

generally speaking, i just try to make sure i’m sitting properly, take regular breaks, have plenty of water at hand, and good music. the rest varies on just how much i’m feeling it on a given day, and how badly i need motivation. hopefully this will help!


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